Dogs Get Cancer, Too

Did you know that companion animals, like dogs and cats, naturally develop many of the same diseases as humans? Statistics show that over 4.2 million dogs naturally develop cancer each year, in comparison to 1.7 million humans. Dogs are actually a very important model for studying diseases, such as cancer, because not only do many dogs naturally develop cancer in their lifetimes, but cancer tumors in dogs are similar to those found in humans affected with the disease. A recent Forbes article discusses the importance of dogs in the biomedical research community’s mission to find a cure for cancer in both humans and animals.

Dogs are also excellent models for cancer studies because they live in the same types of environments as humans, meaning they are exposed to the same bacteria, household products, noises and other stimuli as we are. Dogs also age more quickly than humans. Have you ever heard the saying, “1 human year equals 7 dog years?” Well, for studying diseases like cancer, this popular belief becomes useful. Because the lifespan of a dog is shorter, it experiences the different stages of cancer much more rapidly than humans. This allows researchers to collect invaluable data in a speedier manner than when collecting data from human cancer patients.

Mice, which make up ~95% of all animals used in biomedical research, are excellent models for most areas of research, but dogs provide a unique model for finding cures and treatments for cancer in both humans and animals.

Please follow this link to read the full Forbes story about the importance of dogs in finding a cure for cancer in humans and animals.

Matt Bailey Named Executive Vice President of FBR

NABR Executive Vice President Matthew R. Bailey has been appointed Executive Vice President of the Foundation for Biomedical Research (FBR).  Matt joined the NABR staff in 2005 and played an integral role in the vigorous campaign for passage of the federal Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act (AETA).

Promoted to EVP of NABR in 2014, Matt will now serve management roles in both organizations.  In making the announcement on Tuesday, Frankie L. Trull, President of both organizations said, “FBR and NABR work in tandem to ensure a pro-research climate that allows the continued humane use of lab animals in biomedical research. While the organizations’ objectives and audiences differ, our programs and initiatives are strategically integrated and complementary.”

Focused primarily on science and technology issues throughout his career, Matt has extensive political experience. He was previously a congressional liaison for the U.S. Department of Commerce and has held positions in both the House and Senate. Born and raised in Arkansas, Matt and his wife, live in the Washington, DC area, with their two daughters. Despite his lack of sleep for the past several years, Matt brings his vibrant energy and unique leadership to FBR. Please join us in congratulating him on his new role.

Nancy Reagan: A Legacy as a Science Advocate

On Sunday, March 6, Nancy Reagan, wife of former President Ronald Reagan, died at the age of 94.  Besides being the First Lady, she was a devoted wife and mother, key advisor, fashion icon, and an anti-drug champion, launching the “Just Say NO” campaign.  But did you know she was a staunch supporter of medical research?

Earlier today the Foundation for Biomedical Research (FBR) took a closer look at the First Lady’s role as an advocate for science.  After President Reagan was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 1994 she became a vocal proponent for research into brain diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.  The Regan’s also founded the Ronald and Nancy Reagan Research Institute to focus on, understand, and treat Alzheimer’s.  Information gathered from mice, stem cells, and primates have been utilized in this important hunt for a cure.

Nancy Reagan’s accomplishments will be remembered for a long time and her advocacy for scientific research will never be forgotten.  To learn more about her focus on improving research opportunities, please read FBR’s story here.

Follow NABR on Twitter to Get Your News Fast!

Ever wish that you could get your research-related news delivered to you almost immediately?  Then be sure to follow NABR on Twitter at @NABRorg today!

Over 218 million people use Twitter daily because it is a quick and simple way to communicate and stay informed.  On NABR’s Twitter feed, you’ll be able to get the latest in animal research news, policy updates from Capitol Hill and in the states, NABR member news, and other updates you need to stay informed.

These updates will be sent directly to you, whether you’re at home, in the lab, or on the go to your mobile device.  Be sure to follow NABR at @NABRorg on Twitter and don’t forget to follow the Foundation for Biomedical Research (FBR) at @ResearchSaves for more timely news and information.