Mark your Calendars for NABR’s October Webinar

NABR will be hosting our next webinar, “Advocating for Sound Public Policy: The Challenges and Opportunities for Participating in the Process” on Tuesday, October 9. In this webinar, we will discuss what constitutes sound public policy, how NABR engages in that process, and —most importantly— what NABR members can do to assist.

For example, in the past year, the research community has been afforded opportunities to respond to Requests for Information (RFI) on reducing regulatory burden from the USDA, the NIH, and the FDA. These RFIs have provided the research community an excellent opportunity to advocate for the development and implementation of improved regulations, policies, and guidelines.

On July 25, the Health subcommittee of the House Energy & Commerce (E&C) committee held a hearing titled "21st Century Cures Implementation: Updates from FDA and NIH." During that hearing NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins responded to questions concerning the regulatory relief mandate in the 21st Century Cures Act. In this webinar we will discuss how NABR formulates responses to those RFIs and we will review how the research community can participate in these processes, draft their own responses, and engage in the policy process to have a significant impact on the environment in which we all work.

Click here to reserve your spot!

DC Circuit Court Affirms Denial of Primate Import Data to PETA

A unanimous decision by a three-judge panel of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld the denial of primate importation data to PETA.  PETA requested primate importation data from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) in 2014.  In response to PETA’s FOIA request, the CDC notified ten affected importers, seven of which objected to the disclosure of the information to PETA. The CDC ultimately withheld information about the number of nonhuman primates in each shipment, the size of their crates, and the airline carrier used under Exemption 4 of the FOIA. FOIA Exemption 4 protects from disclosure “trade secrets and commercial or financial information obtained from a person and privileged or confidential.”

The CDC argued that disclosing the information to PETA would harm the importers, as information about the number of primates imported, the size of the crates and the airline carrier used is maintained by the importers as confidential and the release may result in competitive harm, including disruption of supply routes.

As NABR members know, animal rights organizations, including PETA have long targeted airlines, in an attempt to pressure them into refusing to ship nonhuman primates for research.  The Court of Appeals recognized the risks associated with shipment noting that “knowing in the abstract which airlines transport nonhuman primates is very different than knowing which importers have relationships with which airline carriers, and which airline carriers are willing to transport which species of nonhuman primate along which routes and from which countries.”

The D.C. Circuit Court upheld CDC’s denial of the information to PETA and the Court of Appeals has now also affirmed that decision.

This case highlights the importance of understanding the FOIA and its impact on research.  NABR encourages all members to ensure they have a reviewed the FOIA Guide, Responding to FOIA Requests: Facts and Resources, which was jointly produced by NABR, FASEB and SfN.

Trump Picks HIV/AIDS Researcher as New CDC Director

President Donald Trump has named Robert Redfield as the new director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). His appointment comes after former Director Brenda Fitzgerald resigned following a POLITICO investigation revealing she had traded tobacco, food, and drug stocks while leading the agency.

Redfield, a clinical scientist and former Army doctor, co-founded the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He also previously served on President George W. Bush’s HIV/AIDS advisory panel and in various advisory roles at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The decision has been criticized because of Redfield’s earlier research and views, controversies that POLITICO highlights in coverage of his appointment. He has, however, received the support of Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) who said in a statement, “Although I seldom agree with the Trump administration, I am in complete agreement that Dr. Bob Redfield is the best choice to lead the CDC."