Researchers Using Dog Cancer Drug Against Kids’ Brain Cancer

Could the antidote for glioblastoma, one of the deadliest forms of brain cancer, in children be a current treatment for dogs?  That’s what researchers at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City are trying to figure out. According to an article in The Kansas City Star, it could be.

Researchers for human or animal health have often worked separately.  However, a collaboration between the two could lead to remarkable results. The Kansas City Area Life Sciences Institute brought together over 300 scientists and student-researchers to coordinate efforts on immunotherapy for cancer treatments. That matchmaking birthed a relationship between Children’s Mercy and Elias Animal Health, a Missouri company testing immunotherapy treatments for osteosarcoma in dogs at the veterinary health centers at Kansas State University and the University of Missouri. According to the article, protocols for glioblastoma are in development. Children’s Mercy and Elias Animal Health are planning to apply for a Phase 2 trial with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Glioblastoma kills about 60%-70% of kids within two years, even when treated with standard care like chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. The hope for the success of this partnership is immense; both the human and veterinary angles have something to offer.  Pre-clinical human studies are often conducted with mice are cost-effective but those with higher order species like dogs offer more predictable results. Animal health studies cost less and move more quickly than government-regulated human trials.

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