New Treatment for Epilepsy Discovered with Animals Shows Promise in NIH-Funded Study

A new drug for epilepsy has recently shown promise in clinical trials.  In a study supported by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), researchers found that the drug lorcaserin significantly decreases seizures in zebrafish with the same genetic mutation that causes Dravet syndrome. Dravet syndrome is rare disorder that causes frequents, severe, and drug resistant seizures and developmental delays in children. Other complications include chronic infections, delayed language and speech, and disruptions of the autonomic nervous system. Sadly, the mortality rate for kids with Dravet syndrome is approximately 15%-20%.

Thanks to its success in zebrafish, studies of lorcaserin have advanced to patients and according to a news release, was administered to five children with Dravet syndrome. All five experienced an initial decrease in the frequency of seizures with no serious side effects.  Most notably one child who had multiple seizures daily did not suffer any seizures for two weeks during the study.

This new drug could be a lifesaver and the importance of epilepsy research cannot be understated. According to the Epilepsy Foundation, three million people suffer from epilepsy in the United States alone and there are 150,000 new cases every year.  One-third of those with epilepsy are forced to live with the seizures because there is no treatment that works for them.

To read more about this exciting development, please click here.