Live Vaccines Could Mean Fewer Veterinary Visits

Did you know that our pets can contract the influenza virus?  We may someday be able to thank biomedical research for helping us avoid another trip to the veterinary office. A team of researchers at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry has developed two live vaccines that may help prevent the highly contagious canine influenza, as well as improve human health.

Led by Luis Martinez-Sobrido, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, the team developed a live vaccine that replicates in the main point of entry for the virus—a dog’s nose—which could prevent the virus from spreading to the rest of the body. The results of the study showed that the vaccine is not only safe, but also more effective in protecting dogs against the H3N8 canine influenza virus than currently available inactivated vaccines.

Martinez-Sobrido’s team also used a new technique to remove the NS1 protein from the H3N8 canine influenza virus, successfully weakening the flu virus so an immune response is created without the unpleasant accompanying illness. This approach has been shown to potentially be more safe and effective than the traditional inactivated H3N8 vaccine.

Next, the team will test the two live vaccine approaches in clinical trials with dogs. They ultimately hope to address the spread of influenza in shelters and kennels, as well as from dogs to humans. This research is further being used to address other dog flu viruses, including the H3N2 canine influenza. Early studies indicate that the H3N2 live-attenuated vaccine outperforms the only currently available inactivated vaccine in protecting against the H3N2 virus.

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