NABR Letter to Congress Opposing PUPPERS Act

Today, NABR sent a letter to the chairmen of the House and Senate Appropriations Committees in opposition to H.R. 3197, the “PUPPERS Act,” and a similar amendment offered by Rep. Dave Brat (R-VA) to the House-passed homeland security minibus. The legislation would effectively end studies with canine models at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Earlier this month, 41 scientific and medical organizations and research universities sent a letter to Congress in opposition to these efforts.

Over 40 Scientific, Medical Organizations Write to Congress Supporting VA’s Canine Research

The amount of opposition to proposals by Reps. Dave Brat (R-VA), Dina Titus (D-NV), and freshman Brian Mast (R-FL) to cease funding at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) continues to rise. Today, over 40 organizations in science and medicine wrote to Congress in a letter asking them not to end funding for critical research programs for our nation's veterans.

The letter sent to Appropriations Committee Chairmen Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ) and Sen. Thad Cochran (R-MS) discusses the importance of dogs to scientific progress for humans and animals and encourages Congress not to pass further impediments on research for veterans at the VA. It echoes sentiments already expressed by veteran, military, veterinary, scientific, and medical organizations like the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS), American Brain Coalition (ABC), American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM), Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)The American Legion, American Physiological Society (APS), American Psychological Association (APA), American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), Association of the U.S. Navy (AUSN), Friends of VA (FOVA), Iraq & Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), National Defense Committee, Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA), Square Deal for Veterans, and the Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA). VA Secretary David Shulkin, MD even weighed-in about the issue back in September in a USA Today op-ed.

Currently Congress is considering H.R. 3197 (the PUPPERS Act) and a similar amendment to the House-passed homeland security “minibus,” which seek to end funding for VA studies involving canines.

To read the organizational letter to Congress, please click here.

American Psychological Association (APA) Urges Congress to Oppose Efforts to End VA’s Canine Studies

Earlier today the American Psychological Association (APA) sent a letter to Congress opposing the efforts of Reps. Dave Brat (R-VA), Dina Titus (D-NV), and Brian Mast (R-FL) to cease funding for studies with dogs at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

The letter, signed by Dr. Howard Kurtzman, Acting Director for Science, lauds the importance of animal research. It discusses the importance of animal research to humans and animals and also notes, for over 100 years, how APA has been dedicated towards the caretaking of animals.

H.R. 3197 (the PUPPERS Act) and a similar amendment to the House-passed homeland security “minibus” seek to end funding for VA studies involving canines. Thus far the following are against the propositions by Reps. Brat, Titus, and Mast:

American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS)
American Brain Coalition (ABC)
American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM)
The American Legion
American Physiological Society (APS)
American Psychological Association (APA)
American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)
Association of the U.S. Navy (AUSN)
Friends of VA (FOVA)
Iraq & Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA)
National Defense Committee
Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA)
Square Deal for Veterans
VA Secretary David Shulkin, MD
Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA)

Stay tuned to NABR’s website as more develops on this issue.

Please click on the hyperlinks above to read the opposition statements from veteran, military, veterinary, scientific, and medical organizations.

More Veterans, Science Groups Tell Congress: Don’t End Funding for VA’s Research with Canines

More veterans organizations as well as medical and scientific groups have stated their opposition against proposals by Reps. Dave Brat (R-VA), Brian Mast (R-FL) and Dina Titus (D-NV) to cease funding for important medical research studies involving canines at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

The Iraq & Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA), Association of the U.S. Navy (AUSN), National Defense Committee, Square Deal for VeteransAmerican Brain Coalition (ABC) and the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS) have shared letters of opposition to H.R. 3197 (the PUPPERS Act) and a similar amendment to the House-passed homeland security minibus.

So far, those now against these proposals include:

American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS)
American Brain Coalition (ABC)
The American Legion
American Physiological Society (APS)
American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)
Association of the U.S. Navy (AUSN)
Friends of VA (FOVA)
Iraq & Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA)
National Defense Committee
Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA)
Square Deal for Veterans
VA Secretary David Shulkin, MD
Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA)

Dogs are rarely used in research but sometimes they are the best model for specific studies because of factors like physiological similarities. All research, including research with dogs, is covered by strict oversight at institutions and by the federal government, and animal welfare is a top priority.

Research with dogs has been and continues to be influential in developing new drugs, therapies, and treatments for humans and animals. Of the top 25 most prescribed medications, 22 were developed with research involving dogs; and canines are on the front lines of everything from cardiology, cancer, diabetes, late-stage eye disease and spina bifida research.

To read the letters of oppositions from the organizations above, please click on the hyperlinks.

BREAKING: VA Secretary Pens Op-Ed in USA Today Supporting VA’s Dog Research Program

Today, U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs (VA) David Shulkin joined the American Physiological Society (APS) and the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), along with Friends of VA (FOVA), the Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA), and the American Legion, in his defense of canine research at the VA.

In opposition to language added to the homeland security “minibus” by Rep. Dave Brat (R-VA) and passed by the House last month, which would target for elimination the VA's dog research program, Shulkin wrote a powerful column published this morning in USA Today. The amendment language is similar to H.R. 3197 which is awaiting consideration on Capitol Hill.

"Science and research are more critical than ever in providing breakthroughs for many unique conditions affecting our veterans. America needs VA’s innovative research programs, and veterans and their families have earned them. We owe it to these patriots to do all we can to develop medical advancements that could help restore some of what they have sacrificed in service to our nation," wrote Secretary Shulkin.

Shulkin detailed some of the lifesaving and life-improving discoveries made possible by the VA's canine research program, accomplishments that have included the recent FDA approval of an artificial pancreas and the implantable cardiac pacemaker. He also summarized a current study that could help paralyzed veterans and others with spinal cord injuries ward off potentially lethal lung infections.

To read the Shulkin’s letter in USA Today, please click here.

AVMA, APS, American Legion Support Animal Research, Oppose Ending VA Dog Studies

Three additional national organizations have written to Congress to express their concerns with efforts that would effectively eliminate important research with dogs at the U.S. Department of Veterans’ Affairs (VA). The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), the American Physiological Society (APS), and the American Legion, the nation’s largest wartime veterans’ organization with 2.3 million members, now join the Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA) and the Friends of VA (FOVA) in announcing their opposition.

The first of those efforts, H.R. 3197, introduced in July by Representatives Dave Brat (R-VA) and Dina Titus (D-NV), could have serious implications for veterans because research with dogs has led to life-saving and life-improving treatments for veterans suffering from spinal cord injuries, heart conditions, diabetes, respiratory illnesses, and other diseases experienced through military service. Rep. Brat also introduced similar language in an amendment to the homeland security “minibus” which was passed by the full House last month.

“Dogs are used in vital research that will help improve the lives of our veterans by finding treatments for diseases and conditions affecting the veteran community, including studies on cardiology, diabetes and spinal cord injuries,” writes the AVMA. “The American Legion recognizes the irreplaceable value this research provides for our veterans and appreciate the sacrifice these animals make in the name of science that humans and service animals, as well as duty K-9s, benefit greatly from,” echos the American Legion.

The letter sent by AVMA can be seen by clicking here. APS' letter is available here. The American Legion’s letter is viewable here.

Friends of VA Publicly Opposes Defunding VA Dog Studies

On Friday, Friends of VA Medical Care and Health Research (FOVA) sent a letter to Representatives Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ) and Nita Lowey (D-NY), the Chair and Ranking Member of the House Committee on Appropriations, opposing an amendment passed in the homeland security minibus that would prohibit funding at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for certain studies involving dogs.

FOVA is a coalition of more than 80 national academic, medical, and scientific societies, voluntary health and patient advocacy groups, and veteran service organizations dedicated to providing veterans with high-quality care. FOVA believes “The policy included in the appropriations bill will impede scientific research and unnecessarily delay research advances for our nation’s veterans.”

The amendment to the minibus was introduced by Rep. Dave Brat (R-VA) and passed by the House of Representatives in July. It contains similar language as House standalone bill H.R. 3197, the PUPPERS Act, which would prevent Class D and E studies from being performed at the VA, a move that could set the precedent for a prohibition against the use of dogs in all biomedical research. The legislation is troubling, as it could represent the first time Congress has prohibited the use of an animal species in scientific/medical studies, and it could lead to future laws that target additional species of research animals. The studies performed by the VA involving dogs are critically important in the search for treatments for diseases that impact the veterans’ community and civilians, and are strictly regulated.

As mentioned above, there are two pieces of House legislation that, if signed into law, would limit the use of dogs at the VA. The first piece of legislation is Brat's amendment to the homeland security minibus, a spending bill that would need to be reauthorized each year. The second piece of legislation is a standalone bill that would serve as a more permanent prohibition of certain dog studies at the VA. Although the House amendment to the homeland security minibus was passed in July, the House standalone bill has not yet been considered by the Veterans' Affairs Committee. A Senate standalone companion bill has not been introduced either. Congress is currently in recess until after Labor Day.

Stars and Stripes, a publication widely read by the military community, published a story yesterday about FOVA’s letter. The publication touts a readership of more than one million per day, including “active-duty service members, DoD civilians, contractors, and their families.”

To read FOVA’s letter, please click here. We encourage you to share the letter as well as the Stars and Stripes’ article on your social media pages to help educate the public and policy makers about this harmful legislation.

Paralyzed Veterans of America Explains the Importance of Dog Studies at the VA

Sherman Gillums Jr., Executive Director of the Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA) published an op-ed in The Hill yesterday in strong opposition to legislation that would hinder medical advancements for disabled veterans. “For a veteran facing a lifetime of paralysis after suffering a spinal cord injury, hope is often the last thing to die. Yet, the recently introduced House bill, H.R. 3197, threatens to crush what little hope to which I, and the approximately 60,000 veterans living with spinal cord injury, cling. The act proposes to reduce investment in medical research, and the reason is as simple as it is controversial: animal research.”

Introduced in July by Rep. Dave Brat (R-VA), H.R.3197 would effectively eliminate important research with dogs at the U.S. Department of Veterans’ Affairs. An amendment to the homeland security minibus serving the same purpose was passed by the full House last month. This legislation has serious implications for veterans because research with dogs has led to life-saving and life-improving treatments for veterans suffering from spinal cord injuries, heart conditions, diabetes, respiratory illnesses, and other diseases experienced through military service.

“The VA has a responsibility to consistently find new and better ways of treat America’s heroes. Animal research helps the department do that. The program has helped save and improve countless lives, and it will continue to do so—unless ideology, and in some cases extremism on the issue of animal rights, succeed in forcing the public's attention away from VA waiting rooms, inpatient wards, and rehabilitation gyms across the country. This is where the price of wars across several eras can be seen almost daily, as well as where medicine and science find their ripest opportunities.”

For more information about the importance of dogs in research, please click here.

To read the letter, click here.